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Third hand smoke affects babies in bed

Jonathan Warren

30.03.2011

News

Jonathan Warren
sb10064105ad-001Babies who sleep in the same room as a smoking parent exhibit nicotine levels three times higher than those who sleep in a different room, according to recent research. The study published in BMC Public Health says third-hand smoke that sticks to skin, hair and clothing is responsible for the elevated levels. Researchers explained that babies have elevated nicotine levels even in homes where parents ventilate bedrooms after smoking, smoke at the window or light up when the baby isn’t in the house. Guadalupe Ortega, lead author of the research study and coordinator of the Atenció Primària Sense Fum programme at the Department of Health of the Generalitat de Cataluña said: “Passive smoking is the leading preventable cause of childhood death in developed countries.”

About the author

Jonathan Warren

Jonathan Warren

Time4Sleep owner