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The Recession Bites Into Sleep in the UK

Jonathan Warren

28.06.2010

News

Jonathan Warren
The recession has cut deep into everyone’s finances but it seems that it has also cut into the number of hours sleep we are getting each night. A recent article in the Daily Mirror revealed that on average people in the UK are now going to bed one hour later than before the recession stated. The figures come from a survey carried out by Cambridge Weigh Plan who polled over 3000 people in the UK. Only three years ago 10.47pm was the average time when Brits went to sleep on a week night, now it is 11.41pm. Stress and money worries are two main reasons for people staying up later, with people putting off going to bed because to relax properly. More than half the people who took part in the survey said they stayed up till midnight, with 10% saying they went to bed at 1am or later. Medical Director of Cambridge Weight Plan Professor Anthony Leeds said: “Lack of sleep could be affecting performance at work, personality and outlook on life. We seem to have so few hours to fit every-thing in that we're eating into precious sleep time that the body needs.” Even when people do eventually decide to go to bed they find it hard to get to sleep. People not only worry about their finances, but job security and the stresses of the workplace also lead to sleepless nights for many. The government cuts in public spending and in other areas will do nothing to ease the worries of many who are already stressed about losing jobs and balancing income. Most adults need around Eight hours sleep each night and if you are getting less than that on a regular basis it will have a cumulative effect and you will feel less alert and tired throughout the day. If you feel stressed and find it difficult to get to sleep then there are some things you can do that might help .Taking regular moderate exercise –not too close to bedtime-could help. It doesn’t need to be a big workout, just a brisk walk, jogging or swimming may help. Yoga, relaxation tapes, a hot bath, or listening to some music are other options to consider. If you are suffering from insomnia or having trouble sleeping for any of the reasons we have mentioned (or any others) you don’t need to suffer alone. You can get help by phoning the  Insomnia Helpline (Medical Advisory Service) on 020 8994 9874, which is open for calls Monday to Friday, 6pm to 8pm.

About the author

Jonathan Warren

Jonathan Warren

Time4Sleep owner